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How to Deconstruct a Standard

The following pdf links are resources for deconstructing and breaking-down standards:

Flow Chart on How to Deconstruct a Standard

New Standards Glossary

A Guide for Deconstructing a Standard into Learning Targets

  • Use Classroom Assessment for Student Learning, Chapter 3, as a guide [especially the charts on pages 63, 64, and 82]
  • Read the standard you are deconstructing.  Does it need to be deconstructed?  If yes, continue…..
  • Read the aligned college and career readiness anchor standard.  Look back at the previous grade level standards, then the standards at higher grades to put the standard in context with all grade level expectations.
  • Analyze the selected standard.  What are the key words? [See target terms at the end of the page] What is the intended learning?  What is the intent of the standard?

Also consider:

  • What knowledge will students need to know to be successful?
  • What patterns of reasoning, if any, will students need to master to be successful?
  • What skills, if any, will students need to master to be successful?
  • What products, if any, will students need to practice creating to be successful?

 

  • Determine the overall type of learning target…..knowledge, reasoning, performance skill, or product.
  • Deconstruct into target language [CASL p.82].  Be thoughtful.  Think back to the intended learning.  You are developing a collection of targets that lead students to mastery of the standard.

Knowledge Targets:  Involve a student having the outright knowledge or can use a reference to complete the task.

Reasoning Targets:  Involve a student’s mental processes / thinking strategies.

Performance Skill Targets:  Involve a student doing something that can be observed.

Product Targets:  Involve a student’s creation of  a product.

Check……………

  • Do the targets work together to read the intent of the standard?
  • Would a teacher be able to use what you’ve developed to lead students to mastery of the standard(s)?